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Ryah and Padme are nine-month-old doelings from the award-winning Mystic Acres Oberian line, and are looking for their new home.

Oberians are a cross between Oberhasli (full-size dairy goats) and Nigerian Dwarf (miniature dairy goats). They are quiet, friendly, and easy to contain, with does/wethers/kids requiring only 4 foot field fencing. They make great family or homestead milkers.

The photo gallery above is current; this video of them is from late Summer 2014:

Both girls have their horns, and have been dam-raised with access to organically maintained pasture. They have been handled and loved-on frequently, and are very friendly. They will be ready to be bred this fall, for kids (and milk!) in the spring.

These girls were both single births, born just two weeks apart, and have grown up together. They are more like siblings than just herd-mates. We would prefer that they go to a new home together. $300 for the pair.

Contact Teri or Peter at Braided Bower Farm for more information or to arrange a visit.

 

UPDATE 8/22/12: Starbuck and Boomer went to their new home yesterday. They were the last of our goats available for 2012. Stay tuned for the 2013 arrivals!

UPDATE 8/17/12: Crake and Anakin have gone to their new home! At this time, Starbuck and Boomer are still available.

We have a variety of Oberian (Mini-Oberhasli) wethers who are looking for their new homes. All are very friendly and will make wonderful pets. All are from Mystic Acres’ quality Oberian dairy goat lines.

Crake
Crake

Anakin
Anakin

Starbuck
Starbuck

Boomer
Boomer

Crake and Anakin are cousins; Crake is 3 months old and Anakin is 2 months old. Both of these boys have intact horns, and have been castrated. Crake is a deep reddish brown and Anakin is a medium brown; both have black markings. Both of these boys are sweet and friendly, and with training, could make great pack goats. It would be wonderful if these two kids could find a home together.

Starbuck and Boomer are 4-month-old brothers. Both are disbudded (de-horned) and castrated. Both are shades of light brown with black markings, and both have a frosted nose and ears like their mama. They are best friends, and can usually be found curled up together for their afternoon siesta. We would love for these two boys to be able to remain together.

We are asking $125 for each pair, or $75 per goat if sold singly. Goats are herd animals, and need to live with others of their kind. We will not sell any of these goats separately unless there are already other goats on the property (preferably of a similar size and/or age).

Best buddies
Boomer and Starbuck

Harvest time is so beautiful…

September 15, 2011 By Peter
Filed under: Sights

 

Three Turkens and a Welsummer

September 9, 2011 By Teri
Filed under: Chickens,Pets and Livestock

These kids are now bigger than our adult bantam hens! They’re still kids, though…

(This photo is actually from a couple of weeks ago. I posted it on Facebook and meant to post it here, too, but never got around to it…)

Protected: The new digs

By Peter
Filed under: Sights

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Sephira

August 5, 2011 By Teri
Filed under: Goats,Pets and Livestock

This is Sephira, one of Zoe’s daughters from this year, at one month old. She is now four months old, and has gone to live at her new home, with her uncle Barnabas and aunt Clarisse (Aberdeen’s kids from last year). I can’t believe I didn’t get any more recent photos of her before she left, but fortunately her new person has already sent us several photos of her in her new digs.

Some of our critters get to stay with us for years, but some are with us only for a short time. It’s getting easier to accept that, as time goes by.

Our current totals, including both the recent losses (to hawk and to hatchet) and the recent gains (namely, Maud’s new chicks):

  • 31 chickens (it’s too early to tell the gender for sure yet on this year’s chicks, but those that turn out to be male will be destined for “freezer camp”);
  • 9 goats (two of which are for sale: Zoe’s other daughter, Isis, and Lulu’s boy, Galahad – details on those two coming soon!);
  • 1 dog;
  • 1 cat;
  • …and hundreds of plants!

Sweet Maud and her tiny little peeps

August 3, 2011 By Teri
Filed under: Chickens

Four new babies!

We’re moving our goats to a new area about 300′ from the old one, and the new goat house is almost ready. No, I’m not using a cheap camera; 90° angles are rare here, due to the use of salvaged lumber and also my inexperience with building anything on this scale; it’s sometimes difficult to push a thousand pounds of lumber into the perfect position and secure it with just two hands. But it’s darn solid and should be much nicer for the goats.

Here’s the front, with a nice wide door, to reduce the bottleneck when 9 goats try to rush through at once:

The basic structure is 4x4s with plywood sheathing, which would not stand up to the antics of a goat herd for very long, so the lower part inside is reinforced with, what else, shipping pallets:

…and their new pasture area is really, really ready for some munchin':

 

 

 

 

Darn moles and voles? Darn helpful, actually.

August 1, 2011 By Peter
Filed under: Sights

In all seriousness, we don’t begrudge the little fellas the occasional onion or beet; they contribute far more to the garden than they take. Howzat?

Bear with me a moment and I’ll get to it.

Before industrial agriculture and forestry came around, the ground here was thickly covered in rich, fluffy duff. You can still go into the few remaining scraps of old growth forest and easily push your hand a foot or more into the ground to see what it’s like. If it wasn’t so scarce I’d harvest some as the world’s best potting soil, but it’s mostly been destroyed and takes centuries to recover, so I don’t.

After a clearcut:

…much of the fungal and microbial life that contributes to building this amazing soil is killed off by the sunlight, and fertility is rapidly lost to the dry winds in summer (several months of no rain) and erosion in the winter (~8 months of constant rain). Eventually, what’s left is orange clay that can support only the most persistent “weeds” and deep-rooted trees. Eventually, the hardy, brushy plants will build a new soil layer, but people don’t live that long.

It’s not that bad on our little patch, because the land has been allowed to recover to some extent, but several inches beneath the surface it’s pretty much pure pottery. This is where the voles and other tunneling creatures are indispensable – their tunnels help the rainwater get down to the river without taking everything else along with it, and they break up the hard clay, mixing in the soil that they move around and of course leaving “fertilizer” in their wake.

So they’re quite welcome to a certain share of our harvest; they help us produce it!